Category Archives: After-action reports

Report on the new Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (USEAAR, #12)

 

This post is part of an after-action report of Unconditional Surrender! (Salvatore Vasta, GMT Games) and therefore entirely fictitious.
Written by Salvatore Graniti, Secretary of Legation in the Italian diplomatic service, recently posted to the Italian embassy in London

To his Excellence the Foreign Minister of the Kingdom of Italy
Sir,
the following report on the recent developments in the political leadership of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is most humbly submitted to you.
The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, the Right Honourable Neville Chamberlain, has resigned from his post during a meeting of the War Cabinet in the evening of December 18, after the last German soldiers had been expelled from the south-east of England. He argued that the failed invasion had irrevocably damaged the confidence Parliament and the British people could have in his leadership. He is succeeded by the previous Foreign Secretary Edward Wood, Viscount Halifax. Continue reading

Roosevelt Wins Third Term (USEAAR, #11)

This post is part of an after-action report of Unconditional Surrender! (Salvatore Vasta, GMT Games) and therefore entirely fictitious.
Front page of the New York Times

November 6, 1940

ROOSEVELT DEFEATS DEWEY, WINS THIRD TERM
Incumbent Franklin D. Roosevelt will remain in the White House for another four years. He is sure to have carried at least 311 electoral votes in yesterday’s presidential election. While his challenger Thomas E. Dewey has won more states (likely 29), President Roosevelt’s strength in the populous mid-Atlantic and southern states had him come out on top. Mr. Roosevelt will be the first president of the United States to be sworn in for a third term. Continue reading

Note of Susanna Pouvreau (USEAAR, #10)

This post is part of an after-action report of Unconditional Surrender! (Salvatore Vasta, GMT Games) and therefore entirely fictitious.
Note from Susanna Pouvreau to her neighbor Marianne Dutour, Châtillon-en-Diois, October 16, 1940.

Marianne,
in all brevity: I am gone and will not come back to Châtillon anytime soon. I know what they are doing to our kind in Germany and do not doubt that they will want to do the same to us here. I have taken what I need and know where to go. When Pierre comes back, let him know I left on my own terms. When liberty returns, so will I. Please burn this note.
All my love,
Susanna

Frankreich, französische Kriegsgefangene

French prisoners of war. Is Pierre among them? The picture is based on image 101I-055-1592 of the German Federal Archives, CC-BY-SA.

You can see the current state of affairs in the game in the Twitter thread:

 

Diary entry of Edelgard Traun (USEAAR, #9)

This post is part of an after-action report of Unconditional Surrender! (Salvatore Vasta, GMT Games) and therefore entirely fictitious.

Dresden, August 31, 1940

Tomorrow we complete one year of this war. I, like most Germans, did not want it. I am old enough to remember the World War of 1914—18, and this war looked just the same. Yet I confess that I was carried away when our armies swept through France and took Paris in just six weeks. It seemed like it could be a short war, just enough to restore our glory lost in 1918. But since then, nothing has gone right again. The front in France is bogged down just like in 1914. The Italians have joined the fight in the hope of plunder just like in 1915.
Continue reading

Leaflet by the Italian Propaganda Department (USEAAR, #8)

 

These leaflets were dropped over Bavaria by planes of the Italian air force. The Regia Aeronautica dropped similar leaflets over other regions in the German south, mostly over towns and villages predominantly inhabited by Catholics.

This post is part of an after-action report of Unconditional Surrender! (Salvatore Vasta, GMT Games) and therefore entirely fictitious.   Continue reading

Diary entry of Josephine Lefèvre (USEAAR, #7.2)

This post is part of an after-action report of Unconditional Surrender! (Salvatore Vasta, GMT Games) and therefore entirely fictitious.

Brussels, June 07, 1940

We had a bit more than two weeks. I knew the Nazis would come back, and back with a vengeance they are. The parades have been a more emphatic show of force than ever, the boots are clicked on the ground more forceful than ever, and the delivery of punishment from slaps to executions is faster than ever. We shall not see peace nor freedom as long as the swastika flies over the Grand-Place. Continue reading

Diary entry of Josephine Lefèvre (USEAAR, #7.1)

This post is part of an after-action report of Unconditional Surrender! (Salvatore Vasta, GMT Games) and therefore entirely fictitious.

Brussels, May 18

The sweetest euphoria, the bitterest presentiment! The French 3rd Army has come to our liberation. Continue reading

Excerpts from the reports of the French 3rd Army to the Assemblée Nationale (USEAAR, #6)

Written by Pierre Laval, major at the staff of the French 3rd Army

This post is part of an after-action report of Unconditional Surrender! (Salvatore Vasta, GMT Games) and therefore entirely fictitious.

Verdun, May 7, 1940

The army has left their defensive positions in the Maginot fortresses under the cover of night. Strict secrecy is the soldier’s first duty. No radio contact whatsoever. So far, we advance on Sedan unopposed. Continue reading

Letter by Valdis Bumbulis to his mother Inese Bumbulis (#USEAAR, #5)

This post is part of an after-action report of Unconditional Surrender! (Salvatore Vasta, GMT Games) and therefore entirely fictitious.

Letter written in a POW camp in Daugavpils, delivered by a fellow soldier from the same regiment as Valdis Bumbulis who was discharged from the camp

Daugavpils, April 17, 1940

Dearest mother!
In all brevity: I am alive, I am as well as is to be expected under these circumstances. Everything is a bit makeshift, but we are fed regularly. Even more regularly, the politruks educate us, as we citizens of the Latvian Soviet Socialist Republic have much to catch up on – after all, the LSSR is only two weeks old, whereas the comrades from Russia who are my age have lived all their lives in the Soviet Union and therefore know everything about socialism and the great vozhd Stalin. Once we have learned enough, we are discharged from this educational institution to go back to our homes or join the Red Army in its mighty struggle to liberate the workers in Romania and Finland as they have liberated the Latvians. As I have been much miseducated by my bourgeois uncle, the process might take longer for me. Still, I hope to be home soon. Until then, I remain your loving son
Valdis

 

1940-04-06-03-01

Grin and bear it: Latvian civilians bear signs welcoming the incorporation of their country into the Soviet Union. The signs read “Long live socialist Soviet Latvia” (left sign, in Latvian) and “Long live the leader of the working people, comrade Stalin” (right sign, in Russian). The original picture was taken in Riga in 1940, but it is not known if before or after the Red Army had occupied the country.

Notes of the Diplomatic Proceedings in Rome (USEAAR, #4)

This post is part of an after-action report of Unconditional Surrender! (Salvatore Vasta, GMT Games) and therefore entirely fictitious.

Notes of the diplomatic proceedings in Rome, taken by Salvatore Graniti, junior Secretary of Legation in the Italian diplomatic service

September 21, 1939

The Duce has been anxious to see the German delegation. He congratulates them on the great successes of their armies in Belgium and France. The Germans express confidence of further advances and hint at looking for a partner to share responsibilities for Europe. „We are no southern country, but the Mediterranean must have a firm hand and order as well“, says ambassador von Mackensen. The Duce replies that Germany has no better friend than Italy and that the old privileges of Britain and France must be altered to fit our new times. Continue reading