Tag Archives: France

Two Kingdoms, One King? England, France, and the Hundred Years’ War

For hundreds of years, England and France were the fiercest rivals in Western Europe – from the wars of the Plantagenet kings of England to expand their holdings in France, to those of Napoleon against various British-led coalitions, and then the overseas bickering in the Age of Imperialism as when the two powers clashed at Fashoda. However, at one point it seemed as if this rivalry might come to an end and the two countries might be united: 600 years ago, the king of France recognized the king of England as his heir! We’ll find out how this came to happen and why it did not work out – and what happened instead. It goes without saying that you can expect board games on the way.
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The Treaty of Versailles (Century of German History, #10)

Friends of history, board games, and history in board games! Last year, I started a series called „Century of German History“ covering Germany’s turbulent 20th century. For every decade, I picked one crucial event (that happened in the year ending in a 9), placed it into the wider context, and illuminated it with exactly one board game. Now those of you who counted might have noticed that I didn’t finish this series in 2019. One event was missing – that of 1919. You might blame that on my laziness, but I swear, this time, that’s not true. The defining event of 1919 is the Treaty of Versailles to end World War I – and I wanted to cover that with the upcoming Versailles 1919 (Geoff Engelstein/Mark Herman, GMT Games). However, while I was ready for Versailles 1919, Versailles 1919 was not ready for me yet. Now, the game is about to go to the printers, and I can write about this intriguing design which made it to my list of most anticipated historical board games to be released this year. We’ll talk about the powers involved in the peacemaking at Versailles, the process of negotiations, and what became of it. Continue reading

Note of Susanna Pouvreau (USEAAR, #10)

This post is part of an after-action report of Unconditional Surrender! (Salvatore Vasta, GMT Games) and therefore entirely fictitious.
Note from Susanna Pouvreau to her neighbor Marianne Dutour, Châtillon-en-Diois, October 16, 1940.

Marianne,
in all brevity: I am gone and will not come back to Châtillon anytime soon. I know what they are doing to our kind in Germany and do not doubt that they will want to do the same to us here. I have taken what I need and know where to go. When Pierre comes back, let him know I left on my own terms. When liberty returns, so will I. Please burn this note.
All my love,
Susanna

Frankreich, französische Kriegsgefangene

French prisoners of war. Is Pierre among them? The picture is based on image 101I-055-1592 of the German Federal Archives, CC-BY-SA.

You can see the current state of affairs in the game in the Twitter thread:

 

Diary entry of Josephine Lefèvre (USEAAR, #7.1)

This post is part of an after-action report of Unconditional Surrender! (Salvatore Vasta, GMT Games) and therefore entirely fictitious.

Brussels, May 18

The sweetest euphoria, the bitterest presentiment! The French 3rd Army has come to our liberation. Continue reading

Excerpts from the reports of the French 3rd Army to the Assemblée Nationale (USEAAR, #6)

Written by Pierre Laval, major at the staff of the French 3rd Army

This post is part of an after-action report of Unconditional Surrender! (Salvatore Vasta, GMT Games) and therefore entirely fictitious.

Verdun, May 7, 1940

The army has left their defensive positions in the Maginot fortresses under the cover of night. Strict secrecy is the soldier’s first duty. No radio contact whatsoever. So far, we advance on Sedan unopposed. Continue reading

Mr Chamberlain, end this war! (USEAAR, #2)

This post is part of an after-action report of Unconditional Surrender! (Salvatore Vasta, GMT Games) and therefore entirely fictitious.

Daily Mail, London

October 12, 1939

MR CHAMBERLAIN, END THIS WAR!

Our country has been at war for six weeks now. It has been six weels of unmitigated disaster: Belgium is defeated, France has lost her capital Paris. The French army has proven utterly inept – outmaneuvered, surrounded, destroyed at every turn. So of course when it comes to the heavy lifting, it’s been our boys who had to do it – our fighters rule the sky over France, and we even led the counter-attack that aimed to retake Paris. But how is one to succeed with such hapless allies? Continue reading

The Life & Games of Napoleon Bonaparte (Part 2)

Welcome back to the Life & Games of Napoleon Bonaparte! You can find the first part dealing with Napoleon’s biography here. This second part is going to be a little more analytic, examining his military, political, and cultural legacy – and the games about it (see more games also in the first post).

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